The Civil Rights Project, Harvard University

The Civil Rights Project
125 Mt. Auburn Street  3rd Floor
Cambridge MA 02138

phone: 617-496-6367
fax: 617-495-5210
email: crp@harvard.edu


Contact:  Christopher Edley, Jr.  --  617-495-4614  --  crp@harvard.edu

 

 

Web site:   www.civilrightsproject.harvard.edu

 

Mission (From the website):

"Our mission is to help renew the civil rights movement by bridging the worlds of ideas and action, and by becoming a preeminent source of intellectual capital and a forum for building consensus within that movement."

 

Description:

The Civil Rights Project (CRP) is a leading organization devoted to civil rights research. It has found eager collaborators among researchers nationwide, and wide open doors among advocacy organizations, policymakers and journalists. CRP has initiated joint projects across disciplinary and institutional lines at universities, advocacy organizations, and think tanks throughout the country. CRP directors and staff testify and provide technical assistance on Capitol Hill and in state capitals. Its research has been incorporated into federal legislation, cited in litigation, and used to spur Congressional hearings. In any given month, CRP work is quoted in such national media as The Village Voice, The New York Times, Time Magazine and The News Hour with Jim Lehrer.

CRP's increasing national prominence and rapid growth confirm that the initial vision was correct, and provide the backdrop for an ambitious financial, programmatic and strategic agenda. The next five years will be critical as CRP seeks to expand its capacity into additional areas, including: (1) community security and criminal justice; (2) voting rights and deepening democratic engagement; (3) metropolitan economic opportunity (including housing, growth and employment); (4) community and family wealth; and (5) health care justice.

 

Resources to Share:

Focusing initially on education reform, CRP has convened dozens of national conferences and roundtables; commissioned over 300 new research and policy studies; produced major reports on desegregation, student diversity, school discipline, special education, dropouts, and Title I programs; and published seven books, with four more in the editing stage.